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Andrew Sullivan

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04/16/2014 14:21:06

pitchfork:

Read Stuart Berman's Best New Reissue review of Slint’s 1991 touchstone Spiderland.

mine just arrived yesterday. so excited.

pitchfork:

Read Stuart Berman's Best New Reissue review of Slint’s 1991 touchstone Spiderland.

mine just arrived yesterday. so excited.

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04/16/2014 11:08:45

The Cinnamon Snail Gets a New Snail Shell

these guys serve delicious vegan food on the streets of nyc but need some help getting their truck back on the street

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04/15/2014 15:02:00

retronewyork:

New York City Subway 1958. Ralph Crane—Time & Life Pictures/Getty 

retronewyork:

New York City Subway 1958. Ralph Crane—Time & Life Pictures/Getty 

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04/15/2014 14:23:18

campaignmoney:

Happy Tax Day!
"Twenty-five profitable Fortune 500 companies, some with a history of tax dodging, spent more on lobbying than they paid in federal taxes between 2008 and 2012, according to Public Campaign analysis of data from Citizens for Tax Justice and the Center for Responsive Politics. Over the past five years, these 25 corporations generated nearly $170 billion in combined profits and received $8.7 billion in tax rebates while paying their lobbyists over half a billion ($543 million), an average of nearly $300,000 a day."
(Via Public Campaign)
 

campaignmoney:

Happy Tax Day!

"Twenty-five profitable Fortune 500 companies, some with a history of tax dodging, spent more on lobbying than they paid in federal taxes between 2008 and 2012, according to Public Campaign analysis of data from Citizens for Tax Justice and the Center for Responsive Politics. Over the past five years, these 25 corporations generated nearly $170 billion in combined profits and received $8.7 billion in tax rebates while paying their lobbyists over half a billion ($543 million), an average of nearly $300,000 a day."

(Via Public Campaign)

 

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04/15/2014 13:28:41

theatlantic:

The State of American Beer

What’s going on in Beer World? Beer lovers of America might be forgiven if their grasp of the current brew-scape feels iffy. Alice herself would be at home in this Wonderland. It’s a world in which up is down, little is big, and there’s no Blue Moon on the horizon. 
It’s a world in which old standbys are faltering (case sales of Miller High Life were down almost 10 percent in 2013 from the prior year). Mexican labels are dominant (Corona, Modelo, and Dos Equis, account for three of the top four imported beers). And a craft-beer company founded only 20 years ago is coming on strong (“Bartender, pour me a Lagunitas”).
The March 2014 issue of Beverage Industry offers us a through-the-looking-glass portrait of Beer World in the United States today. The magazine unleashed its writers on data gathered by Information Resources Inc. (IRI) of Chicago from supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, gas and convenience stores, military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains for the 52 weeks ending December 29, 2014. I made graphs and charts from their tabular data.
Before we delve into the particulars, let’s remember the big picture: over the past twenty years, per-capita consumption of beer in the U.S. has been declining. Derek Thompson wrote about that here last August, citing this report. But twenty years is a long lens. Let’s take a look at the state of Beer World in the last year.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The State of American Beer

What’s going on in Beer World? Beer lovers of America might be forgiven if their grasp of the current brew-scape feels iffy. Alice herself would be at home in this Wonderland. It’s a world in which up is down, little is big, and there’s no Blue Moon on the horizon. 

It’s a world in which old standbys are faltering (case sales of Miller High Life were down almost 10 percent in 2013 from the prior year). Mexican labels are dominant (Corona, Modelo, and Dos Equis, account for three of the top four imported beers). And a craft-beer company founded only 20 years ago is coming on strong (“Bartender, pour me a Lagunitas”).

The March 2014 issue of Beverage Industry offers us a through-the-looking-glass portrait of Beer World in the United States today. The magazine unleashed its writers on data gathered by Information Resources Inc. (IRI) of Chicago from supermarkets, drug stores, mass merchandisers, gas and convenience stores, military commissaries, and select club and dollar retail chains for the 52 weeks ending December 29, 2014. I made graphs and charts from their tabular data.

Before we delve into the particulars, let’s remember the big picture: over the past twenty years, per-capita consumption of beer in the U.S. has been declining. Derek Thompson wrote about that here last August, citing this report. But twenty years is a long lens. Let’s take a look at the state of Beer World in the last year.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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04/10/2014 15:17:33

newsweek:

When George Laurer goes to the grocery store, he doesn’t tell the check-out people that he invented the barcode, but his wife used to point it out. “My husband here’s the one who invented that barcode,” she’d occasionally say. And the check-out people would look at him like, “you mean there was a time when we didn’t have barcodes?”
A time without barcodes is hard to imagine now. But it wasn’t that long ago, and the story doesn’t start with George Laurer. It starts with an engineer named Joseph Woodland. In 1948 Woodland was trying to come up with simple symbol that, when scanned, would translate to a number that a computer could use to identify a product.
The Untold History of Where Barcodes Come From

newsweek:

When George Laurer goes to the grocery store, he doesn’t tell the check-out people that he invented the barcode, but his wife used to point it out. “My husband here’s the one who invented that barcode,” she’d occasionally say. And the check-out people would look at him like, “you mean there was a time when we didn’t have barcodes?”

A time without barcodes is hard to imagine now. But it wasn’t that long ago, and the story doesn’t start with George Laurer. It starts with an engineer named Joseph Woodland. In 1948 Woodland was trying to come up with simple symbol that, when scanned, would translate to a number that a computer could use to identify a product.

The Untold History of Where Barcodes Come From

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04/10/2014 15:13:15

theatlantic:

In Focus: London and the U.K. From Above

Photographer Jason Hawkes has been making fascinating aerial images since 1991. With a gyro-stabilized camera, he takes photos directly from the open door of a helicopter. Hawkes has covered subjects around the world, but specializes in aerial shots of the United Kingdom. Once more, he’s been kind enough to share some of his recent photos with us here.

Read more.

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04/10/2014 10:47:14

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04/10/2014 10:20:50

newyorker:

Last week, the New York Public Library released twenty thousand maps from its extensive collection. Take a look at five that unearth New York City’s past: http://nyr.kr/1oKjBDd
Above: Pocket edition of “The Merchant’s and Shipper’s Guide Map to the Port of New York,” by S. D. L. Taunton (1879).

newyorker:

Last week, the New York Public Library released twenty thousand maps from its extensive collection. Take a look at five that unearth New York City’s past: http://nyr.kr/1oKjBDd

Above: Pocket edition of “The Merchant’s and Shipper’s Guide Map to the Port of New York,” by S. D. L. Taunton (1879).

(Source: newyorker.com)

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04/08/2014 14:09:50

newshour:

Haunting photos of World War I reveal how little Europe has changed in 100 years.

See more photos here.

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pg 2 of 309

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